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Review: The Woman In The Window

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This is a spoiler-free review. I will not be giving away any major plot details beyond the premise of the book. 

The Woman In The Window by A.J. Finn is an upcoming psychological thriller book about an agoraphobic woman who witnesses a crime through her townhouse window and struggles to get the police to believe her because she was on strong medication at the time. I’ll include the official synopsis because it describes the plot really well:

“It’s been ten long months since Anna Fox last left her home. Ten months during which she has haunted the rooms of her old New York house like a ghost, too terrified to step outside. When the Russells move in, Anna is instantly drawn to them. A picture-perfect family of three, they are an echo of the life that was once hers. But one evening, a frenzied scream rips across the silence, and Anna witnesses something no one was supposed to see. Now she must do everything she can to uncover the truth about what really happened. But even if she does, will anyone believe her?”

This book hasn’t been released yet- it comes out in January 2018 -but I was lucky enough to receive an Advanced Readers Copy from HarperCollins and I was so excited to read it because the plot just sounds so cool. I can certainly say it lived up to the expectations and I ended up reading it in just two days. The protagonist, Anna, was so interesting to read about. I didn’t know a lot about agoraphobia so it was interesting to get inside her head and learn about that and where it comes from for her (which is a big part of the story and is slowly revealed through flashbacks as the novel progresses). She was a very flawed and vulnerable character which made her feel real.

The plot was thick, with just enough twists and turns to keep me interested. At times the story was a bit predictable, but it didn’t ruin it for me because there were plenty of totally unexpected moments to make up for it. The mystery behind it (which I won’t go into because of spoilers) made this book a page-turner. I read through it so quickly because I was desperate for answers, and dying to know what happened next. The writing was sharp, always matching the mood while holding the same tone throughout. The descriptions were clear and the narration placed me so easily into Anna’s mind.

Everything about this book kept me interested the entire way through. There was a huge mystery, thrilling scenes that got my heart pumping, complex characters, and perfectly placed plot-twists. The writing was fantastic and captivating, while at the same time remaining simple and easy to read. I would highly recommend The Woman In The Window to anyone. The film rights have already been picked up by 20th Century Fox. Without a doubt, it’s going to be the next Gone Girl. In a year from now, everyone will be talking about this book.

The Woman In The Window will be released on January 2 in the US, January 15 in Australia, and January 25 in the UK.

MY RATING: 9/10

READ IF YOU ENJOYED:
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Girl On The Train by Paula Hawkins

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK ON GOODREADS

CLICK HERE TO PRE-ORDER IT ON BOOK DEPOSITORY

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Review: Renegades

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This is a spoiler-free review. I will not be giving away any major plot details beyond the premise of the book. 

Renegades is the latest book by bestselling author, Marissa Meyer, who is best known for her Lunar Chronicles series. Renegades is the first book in a duology, set in a fictional city called Gatlon, and revolves around teenage superheroes. To give you the best possible understanding of what this book is about, I’ll include the official blurb…

The Renegades are a syndicate of prodigies—humans with extraordinary abilities—who emerged from the ruins of a crumbled society and established peace and order where chaos reigned. As champions of justice, they remain a symbol of hope and courage to everyone… except the villains they once overthrew. Nova has a reason to hate the Renegades, and she is on a mission for vengeance. As she gets closer to her target, she meets Adrian, a Renegade boy who believes in justice—and in Nova. But Nova’s allegiance is to the villains who have the power to end them both.

I want to start off by saying that I love Marissa Meyer’s books. She’s easily my favourite author, and her Lunar Chronicles series is my favourite series of all time. And with Renegades, she has done it once again! As always, her plot is thick, her characters fly off the page, and her writing is sharp and aesthetically pleasing. She tackles issues that young people face in their everyday lives, such as having to make tough choices, dealing with parental expectations, and most importantly: questioning the difference between right and wrong – something that everybody struggles with from time to time.

As the book progresses, the plot continues to thicken. The story focuses on Nova going undercover, joining the Renegades herself to bring them down from the inside. From there, she continues to find out more about the organisation’s secrets while simultaneously trying to make sure they don’t figure out who she is. Adrian has secrets of his own, and as he and Nova grow close to one another, a spark begins to appear between them. But this isn’t a romance novel. There’s a definite connection between Nova and Adrian, but no over-the-top, unrealistic teen love that makes you want to roll your eyes.

Marissa Meyer has created characters that feel real – that don’t always understand themselves how they feel. Apart from Nova and Adrian, there is an entire cast of supporting characters that all contribute to the story. But Nova easily shines above all others. She is the ultimate anti-hero, doing things that are seemingly wrong, and yet you can’t help but consider maybe she is onto something. While reading this book, I was rooting for Nova, even though she is, in most ways, the villain. Right from the first chapter, you understand why she hates the Renegades, and how she was raised to see them as the enemy.

Meyer’s writing is stunning. She manages to write third-person chapters that sometimes follow Nova and other times follow Adrian, and yet but they each have a distinctive voice. This isn’t easy to do, but Meyer pulls it off. She’s clear, witty, and builds her world so perfectly without using over-description or unnecessary exposition. The action scenes were fun and exciting, the dialogue felt real, and the narration brought the characters to life. With each turn of the page, the plot became more intriguing. The one negative thing I will say is that sometimes the story was predictable, but at the same time, there were enough surprises to balance it out. The book was left open-ended, with a cliffhanger that has now left me desperately counting down the days until the release of Book 2 in November 2018.

MY RATING: 10/10

READ IF YOU ENJOYED:
The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer
Warcross by Marie Lu

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK ON GOODREADS

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE IT ON BOOK DEPOSITORY

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October Wrap Up

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Books I Read This Month

I read so many books this month (a total of 11; a new record for me) because I’ve been in such a reading mood, and also I participated in a 24-Hour Readathon, so that helped. Because I read so much, I won’t go into much detail on my thoughts on each book, but rather just a quick summary…

The first book I read this month was Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu, which is about a young girl who starts a feminist zine to combat the sexist football player guys at her high school. I loved this book so much. I think it’s the book that every young girl – and boy – needs to read, and I’ve written a full review on it which you can read here.

The second book I read was Geekerella by Ashley Poston. It’s a retelling of Cinderella about a girl who is a huge fan of this sci-fi show that is being rebooted with a new movie, and she isn’t happy with the actor chosen to play. She ends up receiving anonymous text messages and starts a flirtatious relationship with this person, not knowing it’s the actor she dislikes. This was a really cute story- a quick read that was lots of fun and a love letter to fan culture.

The next book I read was my spooky Halloween read for the month, and that’s There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins. It’s a slasher horror about a series of murders at a high school, each one becoming more gruesome. I love that kind of cheesy cliche horror, so I liked this book, and you can read my full review for it here.

This month I was very lucky to receive an Advanced Readers Copy of The Woman In The Window by A.J. Finn. It’s a psychological thriller about a woman with agoraphobia who spies on her neighbours through her window. One day she witnesses a horrible crime, but nobody believes her story because she was on medication and alcohol at the time. I liked this book, and I’ll be doing a full review on it in the coming weeks. The Woman In The Window will be released in January 2018.

The next book I read was Simon Vs The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli. This was a really cute, quick read about a high school boy named Simon who is gay and in the closet, and then is blackmailed by a fellow student who finds out. This book was an accurate look at what it’s like to be gay in high school and to be in the closet, and I loved it.

The next three books I’ll talk about together because I read them as part of a 24-hour readathon. The first was Turtles All The Way Down by John Green, which was a really sweet book. There was mystery, there was drama, there were interesting characters. I didn’t find this book to be amazing or life-changing, but I did enjoy it. The second book was Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer, which is a graphic novel spin-off to her Lunar Chronicles series. I had already read this when it first came out so this was a re-read for me and I loved it just as much this second time. The final book I read for the readathon was Magnus Chase and the Sword of Summer by Rick Riordan. I had heard so many good things about this book, and I understand why now because it was so fun and exciting and I can’t wait to continue the series.

The next book I read in October was another re-read, and that’s Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas. This series is probably my second-favourite of all time, and after reading the latest book in the series, I decided I wanted to re-read them all.

The next book I read was The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee which is just like Gossip Girl but set in the future. It’s the twenty-second century, and there’s this 1000-story building in New York City, and the book follows the story of the wealthy teenagers who live there and all of the scandals going on in their lives. It was a cool book to read, there was a lot of sci-fi stuff, but mostly it was fun to watch spoiled teenagers destroy their own lives.

The last book I finished reading this month was Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo. I loved the movie, so I decided to pick this one up, and I found it to be cool and well-written, but it didn’t have much of an effect on me. I enjoyed it, but it wasn’t amazing or page-turning for me.

What I’m Reading Now

Crown of Midnight by Sarah J. Maas

Books I Bought This Month

There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins
The Woman In The Window 
by A.J. Finn (ARC sent to me by HarperCollins)
Turtles All The Way Down by John Green
Simon Vs The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Magnus Chase and the Sword of Summer by Rick Riordan
The Selection by Kiera Cass
Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo
The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee

Books I Hope To Read In November 

Renegades by Marissa Meyer
The Dazzling Heights by Katharine McGee
The Selection by Kiera Cass
Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas
Queen of Shadows by Sarah J. Maas

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Review: There’s Someone Inside Your House

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This is a spoiler-free review. I will not be giving away any major plot details beyond the premise of the book. 

There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins is a young adult horror novel about a series of murders at a small town high school, witch each murder becoming increasingly gory and extravagant. The main character, Makani, has recently moved to this small town from Hawaii, after an incident that led her to flee her home and start over again. Makhani begins to suspect that her dark past and these gruesome murders are linked as the mystery unravels.

I really enjoyed this book. It’s is your typical cheesy slasher horror like the Scream or I Know What You Did Last Summer films, but I honestly loved it. That kind of cliche serial killer horror is the kind of horror that I’m into. The big reveals weren’t all that shocking, but they weren’t totally predictable either if that makes sense. One thing that I didn’t like about this book was there was a lot of romance. There was heaps of kissing and touching and sometimes it was mild but other times it felt over the top and romance is nice in a book but sometimes it overshadowed the story, and that’s where it becomes a problem for me. But that doesn’t mean I don’t think people should read this book. If slasher horror is something you enjoy, then the romance aspect shouldn’t put you off because I still loved the story.

The plot was exciting and mysterious. I found myself running a list of suspects and their potential motives in my head to figure out who the killer was. As the book went on, the murders became increasingly frequent, so the pace was constantly on the rise. The scenes with action were very well-written. It was fast and realistic, and the descriptions were very specific in terms of the blood and gore. Slasher horror tends to rely heavily on visuals, so I was wondering how it would work in a book but Stephanie Perkins really pulled it off and made it easy to visualise the murder scenes in my head.

If you’re looking for something spooky to read with Halloween coming up, then I definitely think you should pick this book up. It isn’t scary, it isn’t going to keep you up at night, but it does have spooky vibes, and it’s set in late October, so this is the perfect time of year to read it.

MY RATING: 8/10

READ IF YOU ENJOYED:
Final Girls by Riley Sager
One Of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK ON GOODREADS

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE IT ON BOOK DEPOSITORY

If you enjoyed this post be sure to give it a like, or you can comment to share your thoughts on the book. Please follow me if you’d like to be notified when I post new reviews and check out my various social media accounts here.

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Review: Moxie

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This is a spoiler-free review. I will not be giving away any major plot details beyond the premise of the book. 

Getting to the point straight away with this review, Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu is easily one of my favourite books of the year so far. It’s about a girl named Vivian who goes to a high school where the football players are sexist, and the faculty do nothing about it because they’re the stars of the school and the captain of the team is the principal’s son. And it’s just the tip of the iceberg (more details on how awful this school is to come). So Vivian decides to fight this by anonymously starting a feminist zine that empowers the girls of the school, and it snowballs into a revolution.

I can’t begin to describe my love for this book – for how important it is. Moxie is the book that every young girl – and boy – needs to read. It put modern feminism into perspective, portraying  it perfectly (at least from my understanding). I’m not a girl, and I’ll never understand what it’s like to be one. I can’t speak on behalf of women. But I can say that this is a real issue and more people need to get on board rather than rejecting the concept of feminism. There are so many people nowadays that do because they think feminism and hating men are one in the same and they’re not. And if you disagree and you think feminism isn’t needed – that women are equal to men in society – then keep reading because I’m about to outline just some of the things that happened in this book, which are happening to young girls across the world every day.

Throughout Moxie, Vivian and her female classmates are subjected to sexist slurs from the guys in their classes, and the teachers never do anything about it even when official complaints are made. The school enforces a strict dress code for the girls but not for the boys on the basis that girls shouldn’t be dressing a way that “distracts the boys.” And there are even cases of physical sexual harassment that are swept under the rug by the administration. And these are just a few of the things that go on in this book. Some people may think things like this don’t happen in real life, but they do. Everywhere. All the time.

The story was written well too.  Aside from the important message, it was just a really great book. I finished it in just two days because it was an entertaining story that rose and fell in the all the right places. Everything was so well put together, and the characters felt very real. Their emotions came across so easily, and the book’s feminist statements didn’t feel over the top or out of place. Jennifer Mathieu didn’t need to force the reader to see the injustice at Vivian’s school. It just came naturally. This book made me angry, but in the best possible way. It made me feel stronger about feminism and how important it is. This may be a work of fiction, but it speaks the truth.

I really think people need to read this book. For young girls, it could help them understand that they are worthy. For young boys, it could help them understand how their actions impact other people. And for anyone of any age or gender, Moxie could teach them about what feminism really is.

MY RATING: 10/10

READ IF YOU ENJOYED:
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK ON GOODREADS

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE IT ON BOOK DEPOSITORY

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September Wrap Up

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Books I Read This Month

This month was amazing because there were a bunch of new releases, most of which I had preordered online so I was constantly getting treats in the mail. One I’m still reading and another hasn’t arrived yet because it was just released the other day so I’m hoping it will arrive next week. Anyway, here are the six books I read this month, including the four new releases…

The first book I read in September was King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard. This is the third book in the Red Queen series, which I love. Glass Sword was kind of a let down to be honest. I didn’t hate it but it was pretty dull until the last hundred pages or so. But King’s Cage has put the series back on track. The fourth and final book in the series, War Storm, comes out in 2018 and I’m pumped for it after the ending of King’s Cage.

The second book I read was the first of the September releases and the one I was the most keen for: Tower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas. This is the sixth book in the Throne of Glass series which is one of my all-time favourite series’. This book was easily one of the best. It’s tied for second place on my personal ranking alongside Empire of Storms, second only to Queen of Shadows. Even though Aelin wasn’t in it, this book advances the overall plot of the series. It isn’t just some money grab- there are major revelations about the Valg and the Fae and huge character developments for Chaol.

The next book I read was Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart. This is by the author of the very popular book We Were Liars. I wouldn’t say this book is better, but it’s definitely worth reading. It’s told in reverse order and you piece together more of this great mystery story about identity theft as you read it. I have a full spoiler-free review which you can check out here.

Next I read Warcross by Marie Lu. This book was so fun and exciting. It was about a virtual reality game called Warcross and a girl who hacks her way into the game and ends up becoming an undercover contestant on a mission to find someone who is messing around with the game. I loved this book so much and I did a full review on it if you want to know why which you can read here.

The next book I read was They Both Die In The End by Adam Silvera. It’s set in a world where everyone receives a phone call on the day they’re going to die, and follows the story of two teenagers who try to live their last day to the fullest. This was such a great book and I highly recommend it to young adult readers. But beware, as you can tell from the title, this book does not have a happy ending. You can read my full review here.

The last book I finished reading this month All Rights Reserved by Gregory Scott Katsoulis. I don’t know for sure how I feel about this one. One one hand, the plot is really cool. It’s set in a dystopian world where everything you say costs money. The main character decides to stop speaking, and inadvertently starts a revolution as others begin to follow. It’s really awesome, but on the other hand, there’s lot of legal and technical stuff that made the world confusing and distracted from the story. I’m going to write a review for this in the coming weeks once I’ve thought about it more.

What I’m Reading Now

Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu

Books I Bought This Month

Tower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas
Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart
Warcross by Marie Lu
They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera
Geekerella by Ashley Poston
All Rights Reserved by Gregory Scott Katsoulis
Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu

Books I Hope To Read In October

Pet Sematary by Stephen King
The Shining by Stephen King
Geekerella by Ashley Poston
Turtles All The Way Down by John Green
There’s Someone Inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins (the last September release)
Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Mass (I feel the time has come to reread the series)

If you enjoyed this post be sure to give it a like, or you can comment to share your thoughts. Please follow me if you’d like to be notified when I post new reviews and other cool stuff, and check out my various social media accounts here.

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Review: They Both Die At The End

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This is a spoiler-free review. I will not be giving away any major plot details beyond the premise of the book. 

They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera deals with the age-old question: what would you do if you found out you only had one day left to live? The book is set in an alternate reality of our own in which a company called Death-Cast calls people in the early hours of the morning to tell them they’re going to die that day. It follows the story of Mateo and Rufus, two teenagers who both receive this call and meet through an app called The Last Friend. Together, they make their way around New York City in an attempt to live a lifetime’s worth of adventures in one day.

This book destroyed me. It broke my heart. As you can tell from the title: it did not have a happy ending. And I can say this knowing it isn’t a spoiler because it’s literally in the title. There are no loopholes, and there are no ways to cheat death. If Death-Cast calls, you’re going to die that day. So obviously, the title is correct. I felt I should warn you in case you were hoping otherwise. You’re better off knowing now. It’s interesting, though, going into a book knowing how it’s going to end. Some might even question the point of reading it at all. But the point of this book isn’t the ending: it’s the journey getting there.

Apart from the soul-crushing ending, I loved this book. It was told through split-perspectives, so you get to experience the thoughts and feelings of both the main characters. The way their stories were woven together was brilliant, and the relationship they built throughout felt real and genuine. It’s hard to go into too much detail without giving it away. I just think this is one of those books where you have to read it for yourself and see how touching and beautiful it is.

One really cool thing about They Both Die At The End was that there are numerous chapters that aren’t told from either Rufus or Mateo’s point of view. They’re told in third-person but revolve around a minor character or someone who isn’t all that relevant to the story. They were usually someone who had also received a call from Death-Cast or in some cases, a person who works for Death-Cast. At first, I wasn’t sure why Adam Silvera was giving us these chapters. But I ended up finding them intriguing because they made me realise just how many people die each day. It was a fact I’d always known, but that I’d never dwelt on before. And it made me think about how incredible this world would be where we could know when it’s going to be our last day. It has its drawbacks, which are a huge part of the book. But it also gives you a chance to live your last day to the fullest, to say goodbye to the people you love, and to emotionally prepare yourself as best you can for the moment when you finally kick the bucket.

This book made me think about death and life. It made me think about wanting to live my life to the fullest more – and not that cliche about living each day as if it’s your last. That’s unrealistic, and, in my opinion, not the point of this book. They Both Die At The End highlights how important it is to face your fears, to overcome challenges, to do things just for the heck of it, and to take chances. To take every chance that comes your way. There was a quote used in the book, spoken by Roman Emperor, Marcus Aurelius. I’m going to end this review with that quote to make my point clear and to convince you to just read this book…

“It is not death that man should fear, but he should fear never beginning to live.”

MY RATING: 7.5/10

READ IF YOU ENJOYED:
Me Before You by Jojo Moyes
The Fault In Our Stars John Green

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK ON GOODREADS

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE IT ON BOOK DEPOSITORY

If you enjoyed this post be sure to give it a like, or you can comment to share your thoughts on the book. Please follow me if you’d like to be notified when I post new reviews and check out my bookish Instagram account @thebookperson101

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Review: Warcross

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This is a spoiler-free review. I will not be giving away any major plot details beyond the premise of the book. 

Warcross by Marie Lu is a young adult science fiction novel that’s set in a future where virtual realities are as common as the internet, including a game called Warcross that has spawned an annual international tournament that just about everybody watches. When eighteen-year-old Emika Chen hacks her way into the tournaments opening ceremony, she expects to be arrested for her crime. Instead, the game’s creator, Hideo Tanaka, hires her to go undercover as a competitor in the games to catch a mysterious hacker who is messing around with Warcross.

loved this book. It was set in such a fantastic, imaginative world. There were all of these hints at a cool, technologically advanced future but Marie Lu didn’t ruin it by going into too much detail. The only thing she went into was the virtual reality because it’s such an important part of the story. Everything else was subtle, but there was enough if it that I could visualise this incredible world. The idea of this virtual reality and the game that is Warcross was so intriguing which is why I decided to read this book in the first place – and it lived up to my expectations. Exceeded them, even. Marie Lu’s writing was so gripping. She made me feel like I was in this world and it was easy to loose myself as she unfolded her story.

Another thing that made me fall in love with this book was the main character. Emika is a likeable character from the beginning. Apart from being strong, intelligent, and independent, she also has a big heart. We learn early on how much she loved her now deceased father. When we meet her at the beginning of the novel, she’s struggling to find a job because she has a four-month juvie sentence on her record. But we soon find out that she ended up there because she had attempted to right a wrong that had been imposed upon her best friend. It was clear while reading this book that Emika is a well-developed character. She just flew off the page, and I found it easy to care about her. The only bad thing I have to say about this books is that Emika’s the only character that I was invested in. There are many other characters in the book that are interesting, but I just didn’t care about any of them – only Emika.

The plot of the book was juicy and exciting. There was a balance between this big mystery – who is this hacker and what is he up to – and the actual Warcross games, and the blossoming romance between Emika and a character I won’t name because this is a spoiler-free review. The pacing was balanced – the story rose and fell in all of the right places. The action sequences were fast and exciting, and there were jaw-dropping revelations towards the end that nearly had me throwing the book across my bedroom.

The final pages of the book set up the story for the next one in the series, and now I’m just sad that I have to wait a year for it. I highly recommend you read this book. I had so much fun with it. I loved Emika and her story. I loved the descriptions of this amazing world that Marie Lu built. If you like futuristic, sci-fi stories then this is definitely for you. And if that’s not something you usually read then I still think you should try Warcross because you might find yourself surprised.

MY RATING: 9/10

READ IF YOU ENJOYED:
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS BOOK ON GOODREADS

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE IT ON BOOK DEPOSITORY

If you enjoyed this post be sure to give it a like, or you can comment to share your thoughts on the book. Please follow me if you’d like to be notified when I post new reviews and check out my bookish Instagram account @thebookperson101

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Review: Genuine Fraud

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This is a spoiler-free review. I will not be giving away any major plot details beyond the premise of the book. 

Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart is a young-adult mystery novel that – like Lockhart’s novel, We Were Liars, is really hard to summarise without giving too much away, so I’ll just give you the back-cover blurb:

“Imogen is an heiress, a runaway, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a chameleon, and a liar. Imogen is done pretending to be perfect, and Jule refuses to go back to the person she once was. Somewhere between the mansions of Martha’s Vineyard and the shores of Cabo San Lucas, their intense friendship takes a dark turn.”

So basically, this book is all about identity. It’s about people who want to make themselves over or become somebody else completely. This is really interesting and unlike anything I’ve personally read. But the real gem of this book is that the story is told backwards. It begins with Chapter 18 and works its way in reverse order all the way to Chapter 1, before going back to the end for one last chapter to bring everything together. There’s always a time jump between the chapters, each one being set between a few weeks and a few months before. But the story still makes sense despite it being told in reverse order. As you read it, you start to unravel the mystery that is Jule and Imogen. You discover why they did certain things or how they ended up in certain places. And there are plenty of huge reveals that leave you shocked.

Because this is a short novel and almost everything right from the beginning would be a spoiler, there isn’t much more I can say except that I really liked this book. I don’t want to compare it to We Were Liars but I will just say that I didn’t enjoy this quite as much. It’s a different story just in the same genre. If you liked We Were Liars, then I think you should read this book but just try not to compare them because the stories are quite different.

The one thing that bothered me with this book, particularly in the beginning, was that Lockhart sometimes would over-describe how places and characters looked. There were times where it made sense, but usually it just wasn’t needed – I personally prefer it when authors leave room for the reader to picture these things for themselves. But other than that, this book was compelling and a quick read. I was genuinely (no pun intended) shocked by all of the plot twists and everything tied up together and made sense at the end. So if that sounds like something you’d like then definitely give it a go.

MY RATING: 8/10

READ IF YOU ENJOYED:
We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

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CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE IT ON BOOK DEPOSITORY

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wrap up

August Wrap Up


Books I Read This Month 

This month I finished 7 books (and the first half of 2 others, so technically 8). 2 of these books I read in just a day each and another was in 2 days which is how I got through so many because usually I read between 4 and 6 in a month. Without further ado, here are my quick thoughts on these books…

The first book I read this month was Defy The Stars by Claudia Gray. I actually started reading this at the end of July but finished in August. I really liked this book – it’s a science fiction / space adventure about a robot and a human who come from two enemy planets that end up having to work together. I wrote a full review on this book which you can read by clicking here.

Last month I read Breathe by Sarah Crossan, and this month I read the sequel (and the conclusion to the duology), Resist. I enjoyed this book I thought it was a worthy sequel and conclusion. I haven’t read many duologys but they are something I enjoy – it’s nice to see a story wrap up after 2 books instead of the usual 3 or more. This duology is really underrated and I highly recommend science fiction / dystopian lovers check it out.

For a long time now I’ve wanted to read some of Stephen King’s novels, and this month I finally started with his memoir / writing guide, On Writing. I was mostly reading this book for King’s writing tips but what I ended up enjoying the most was reading about his life and his journey as a writer. I’d definitely recommend this to any fans of King or aspiring writers because his advice is so sharp and constructive.

The first fiction book of King’s I read was Carrie, which is only took me a day to read because it’s very short. I liked it a lot and was really surprised by how sad the story was. I was expecting chills and spookiness, but really it was a sad story that deals with bullying and abuse.

The next one I read was Christine which is the longest of his I’ve read so far. It’s about a seventeen-year-old boy named Arnie who buys a very old car named Christine that is alive. It has a mind of it’s own and becomes very jealous by anyone who gets too close to Arnie. I really liked this book, I thought it was creepy and Stephen King is just an amazing storyteller.

After that, I read Misery which is one of King’s suspense novels, rather than horror. The premise for this book hooked me right away. It’s about a famous author who is kidnapped and held captive by his self-proclaimed number one fan, who reads the final book in his series and is so unhappy with the ending that she forces him to write an additional book. This is my favourite King book I’ve read so far. The plot was unlike anything I’ve ever read before and kept me turning the pages.

The last book I finished this month was Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher. I had already seen the Netflix show earlier this year and I really liked it but I wanted to wait a few months before reading the book. I did like the book but because I watched the show first I feel like I enjoyed it more because it was new and myseterious and also because the story has a lot more to it.

The two books I started but didn’t finish this month were Truthwitch by Susan Dennard and The Gunslinger by Stephen King. Truthwitch just didn’t do much for me, and I didn’t end up finishing it. I don’t think this book was bad – I know a lot of people love this book and I can certainly see why. But for me it was hard to follow and just didn’t excite me enough. As for The Gunslinger, it was hard to get in to. The story was interesting enough, but the writing was so complex and intense that it was hard to follow most of the time. I’m hoping to try it again someday because I would like to read the entire Dark Tower series.

What I’m Reading Now

King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyeard

Books I Bought This Month

1984
 by George Orwell
King’s Cage by Victoria Aveyard
Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
We Were Liars (Deluxe Edition) by E. Lockhart
It 
by Stephen King
Carrie by Stephen King
Christine by Stephen King
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
The Shining by Stephen King
Misery by Stephen King
Gerald’s Game by Stephen King
The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger by Stephen King

Books I Hope To Read In September 

Tower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas
Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart
They Both Die At The End by Adam Silvera
Warcross by Marie Lu
Moxie by Jennifer Mathieu
There’s Someone inside Your House by Stephanie Perkins

If you enjoyed this post be sure to give it a like, or you can comment to share your thoughts. Please follow me if you’d like to be notified when I post new reviews and other cool stuff, and check out my bookish Instagram account @thebookperson101